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Wallpaper – In Trend or Outdated

Is Wallpaper “in” or Outdated?

Question:Is wallpaper “in” these days? I’m afraid it may be dated, is that true?
From: Joanne

Answer:I don’t believe that wallpaper ever dates. It depends entirely on the pattern and situation. Wallpapers can be traditional modern or neutral. In fact there are some that were developed to look like paint but had a very uniform finish. Check out your decorating stores and have a look at what’s available, I’m sure that you will be very surprised. Incidentally we still specify wallpapers and vinyl wall coverings very regularly. Other options are to just paint the wall but use a paper frieze or dado to add the detail to the room. Read this article on using wallpaper for feature walls. Hope this helps.
Written by Lee Brown

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What is Bumph

What is Bumph? Also the Difference between Enamel and Latex Paint
Question: First I want to thank you for your advice today. I have 2 questions. I am an interior design student and was watching an American television show when the aired an apartment in the UK. They mentioned the drapery was lined with a “bumph cloth.” What is a bumph cloth, what is it made of, and what is it purpose? Somehow I think it acts as added insulation against the cold weather. I am working on a class project and learned that oil-based paint is better than Latex. I now have to come up with a budget and was surfing the internet and noticed that retailers in the US sell only acrylic and latex paint, so my question is: Does the painter use powdered pigments and linseed oil to create an oil-based paint for interior painting? I also read on the internet that oil based paint yellows and cracks over time. How long does it take before this occurs? Once again thanks for any help!
From: Audrey, US

Answer: In reply to your queries. Bumph is a cotton waste interlining which is used to add body and insulation to curtains. It is a heavy blanket like cloth that is available bleached or unbleached. As an interlining it is sewn in between the curtain fabric and the lining.
The paint question is tricky. I don’t feel that what you have been told is correct. Oil based and latex/acrylic based paints all have different uses, therefore one is better at some tasks than the other and vice versa. For example oil based paint is better for woodwork and doors, frames, skirtings etc, things that take a lot of wear and tear. Acrylic is better for general walls and ceilings as it is easier to apply and dries quickly. If you visit the paint section on our site we have extensive information on how these paints are put together, their advantages and disadvantages. (there are about 8 pages on paint so you have to read through, I am sure you will find it interesting.) I hope this will give you a better understanding. But to throw you right off, we are in New Zealand and here we now have acrylic paint that has all the properties of enamel (oil based) without the disadvantages! Technology is always working to make our life easier.
Written by Lee Brown

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